Tuesday, January 23, 2007

LiquidMetal

Liquidmetal and Vitreloy are commercial names of a series of amorphous metal alloys developed by a California Institute of Technology research team, now marketed by a firm that the team organized called Liquidmetal Technologies. The alloys contain atoms of significantly different sizes, leading to low free volume (and therefore high viscosity) when melted. The viscosity prevents the atoms moving enough to form an ordered lattice. The material structure also results in low shrinkage during cooling, and resistance to plastic deformation.
Cool stuff. Amorphous metal alloys are actually metallic glass.

17 comments:

Annom said...

Hippe shit!

What practical applications does it have?

a pimp named slick said...

impressive!

cybrbeast said...

Once it's further developed in can be used in a whole range of high strain situations. Also see the wiki link.
For now it's mostly used in sports equipment like golf clubs, skis, tennis rackets etc.

Annom said...

WOW! Amazing material properties!

Anonymous said...

This shall probably be the only redeeming feature of the next Home Alone sequel, sure to percolate in the deadhead of Hollywood sometime soon.

James said...

Very impressive - and it'd be even MORE impressive if the speaker stopped with the marketing bullshit. I would have closed the window early if he said "premiere" one more time.

Please remember that the audience does have a brain.

Anonymous said...

I'm gonna have to throw the BS flag on that one. Watching the video closely, even through poor video you can see inconsistiencies in the bounce height. Drop a few, loop a few. Look again.

Chris Mason said...

Impressive...even if the video shows the laws of physics being broken.

Would be nice if this material really existed though...

Annom said...

This material does exist and it doesn't contradict physical laws.

cybrbeast said...

Yes it DOES exist:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liquidmetal

PO8 said...

I strongly suspect the audio for this one is either highly amplified and not well-synchronized with the video, or faked.

If I'm wrong, then it seems like most of the energy loss must be acoustic. In that case, imagine how this thing would bounce in a vacuum!

cybrbeast said...

I think the highest energy loss would be the friction with the air.

Anonymous said...

Flubber!

Derrick said...

was the narrator...brain from family guy?? btw thts awesome

Anonymous said...

Not fake.
http://www.nasa.gov/vision/earth/technologies/liquidmetal.html

Anonymous said...

This whole column and the whole concept of Liquidmetal is bullshit as long as the Kang brothers are running the show.

They are the two most incompetent executives I have ever met in my life.

name said...

All generalizations are false, including this one.